Contact Me

You may contact me through the "Forum" tab; and through e-mail if absolutely necessary: BugEric247ATgmailDOTcom.

Follow me on:

Facebook where I post notifications of new blog posts, plus links and news items related to insects and arachnids.

I also have a group page on Facebook called "Arthropods Colorado" where I post recent images of insects and spiders I find close to home; and where others can post their images as well. Please ask to join and I will add you within a day or so.

I rarely use my Twitter account, but at least you can receive notifications of new blog posts through this social media outlet.

My LinkedIn profile is where I update my work experiences and projects apart from blogging. Connect with me there if you like.

You can see my best images of insects, birds, and other wildlife on my Flickr photostream.

Feel free to follow me on Project Noah, too, where I post "spottings" from all across the U.S.

Thank you for your interest in my activities. I look forward to supporting your own endeavors in natural history.

19 comments:

  1. Eric, I recently observed a Four-toothed Mason Wasp on a neighbor's flower for several minutes. I did not get a photograph, but what I found especially interesting is that it had a smaller version of itself on its back. Was this mating behavior? I live in Western Massachusetts.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is not the appropriate place for this query. That is why I opened a "forum" page (see tabs at the top of this page). BUT, yes, sounds like a male on top of a female, or perhaps a parasitic thick-headed fly, which can resemble a wasp itself.

      Delete
  2. I love your blog and was wondering if you accept donations. My fraternity is big on philanthropic events and would like to host one for you and your causes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Paul, I'm flattered, but I don't know that I warrant a philanthropic effort. I do have a donation button, though (see sidebar to the right), and I am grateful for those individual expressions of gratitude. Thank you.

      Delete
  3. Thanks for your army cutworm identification. I think that you saved our school garden. Now to create aluminum barrier collars to prevent them from eating our harvest!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're most welcome. Good luck with the garden!

      Delete
    2. Dear Bug Eric,
      Hello! I am a Pre-K Teacher. The 4 and 5 year olds in my class collected Cicada shells off a tree on our playground. They are fascinated! Is there a way to preserve the shells? The children want to investigate them, but they are so fragile. One of my friends began to cry when his Cicada shell fell into pieces. Any ideas would be helpful! Thanks!

      Delete
    3. No shed exoskeleton from *any* insect is going to hold up under constant handling. I'd simply put them in transparent containers. I have also heard of folks "embedding" specimens in hand sanitizer in a transparent container.

      Delete
  4. Hi Eric, I have a question for you pertaining to allowing a certain species of spider to live in your house....

    Would either a Micrathena Gracilis or a Gasteracantha Cancriformis be good to allow to live in a basement with a severe small to medium sized beetle and small roach "problem"? I suppose it's not a full blown infestation of the beetle and "waterbugs", from what I gather... I know of a couple of spots where either one species or the other thrive.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Since both of the orbweavers you mention are decidedly *outdoor* spiders, I would say no, they would not fare well in a basement. Plus, they overwinter as spiderlings in the egg sac, not as adults. Maybe I am misunderstanding your question, not sure.

      Delete
  5. Hi Eric,

    I thought you might be interested in this new research on paper wasp castes for the 'wasp' category on your blog. There is some nice footage of queen behaviour.

    https://youtu.be/Q1AtTruSOUo


    Best wishes.

    Rob

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Eric.
    I'm in South Africa.
    Can you please tell me if Bee Flies are regarded as Bee Mimics?
    Poecianthrax arethusa.


    Thanks .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, most bee flies (family Bombyliidae), would be considered bee mimics. A few are wasp mimics.

      Delete
  7. Hi Eric, I'm an artist and have a keen interest in spiders (mostly the genus Latrodectus). I used the Latrodectus mactans photograph as reference for my painting. I'm hoping when finished i'd like to advertise the painting as a seller. I just wanted to ask would that be okay? Regards. Carl. Watercolourist on arachnology.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In the future, I ask that you request permission *before* you commence work on a piece that uses someone else's image as reference (mine or anyone else's work). Thank you. I can't very well deny you control over your *own* work, after the fact, nor would I, but please get the steps in proper order next time.

      Delete
  8. Eric,
    I am a naturalist in a county park in Ohio and was wondering if I could use any of your pictures for a spider bulletin board I am putting together for our nature center? There is no admission fee to enter the nature center, and no money will be made. I am currently looking at your awesome pic of the micrathena sagittata, but would like to use a couple more if permission is given. Thank you very much.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nora, please e-mail me so I can learn more about your nature center, and furnish the image files if I agree to. Thank you. BugEric247ATgmailDOTcom.

      Delete
  9. Hi Eric, I just happened to come across this blog as I was looking for info on how long these spiders live. We have a lovely one that lives on our little home library. She's been there since the summer and has a pretty big web by the window attached to some shelves. You'll laugh, but I want to paint this room and I don't want to hurt her. I can't paint the room without moving the things her web is attached to. Do you know how long they naturally live? I could wait to paint! In the alternative, should I move her outside in early spring? Or in the other alternative, if I ruin her web but put her in a container till I'm done painting, will she rebuild the web? Thank for any help!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Since this comment is not on a blog post about *any* spider, I am not sure which kind of spider you are referencing. I assume an orb weaver (round web like a wheel). Also don't know where you are located, how the spider survived at *all* if she was indoors all this time....If she is healthy enough, she'd rebuild her web. However, she needs water (spritzing her web alone would work), and the occasional insect prey.

      Delete